Busy, busy, busy… And what else happened this week?

November 12, 2010 § Leave a comment

Oh, hedgehog, you silly sausage!

I’ve been busy job hunting over the last few days, so I haven’t had much time to write anything. However, there has been some interesting stuff going on that I haven’t covered, which I thought would be cool to highlight here.

  1. XBox LIVE Indie Games developers saw their titles moved back to the Games & Demos section of the 360 dashboard, as they rightly should have stayed in the first place. Great news for those devs that reportedly saw their sales halve overnight, and it puts Microsoft in a pretty good light, too – listening to the little guy, and responding. (Via Eurogamer.net.)
  2. A bunch of Black Ops stuff: strong review scores all-roundrecord-breaking salesproblems with the PC version of the game; and patches and promises from Treyarch. Pretty bummed out to see the PC version released in a state that left the multiplayer unplayable for a lot of people, and in the end it convinced me to buy the cheaper 360 version instead. I just can’t be arsed with the hassle of broken games any more, and then waiting for a patch to come out. Too little, too late, for me. (Multiple sources.)
  3. This slideshow presentation on “Gamification” and how marketers misunderstand the concept, where they go wrong with it, and what makes games actually “fun” to play. These are essential, fundamental ideas that marketers – both social media and digital – need to get their heads around for their efforts to succeed in this space. Badges aren’t enough, people! (Authored by Sebastian Deterding.)
  4. Trouble for Windows Phone 7: after initially optimistic reports of high demand around the world, it appears that handsets featuring the new OS have only sold 40,000 units in the US so far, while in Europe the numbers stand at around 250,000, faring slightly better. I suggested it could be a supply problem holding back demand. Nevertheless, it’s not auspicious news, but the expectations for the phones have been remarkably, somewhat unfairly, high. The word “flop” has been thrown around too quickly, in my opinion, and in others’. It’s certainly possible that the phone will indeed flop, but it’s still too early to tell, and I think it’s a mistake to count Microsoft out just like that. I hope the platform achieves some sort of success, as competition breeds innovation and, generally, lower-priced deals for consumers. (Multiple sources.)
  5. More phones news, but this time it’s Android: alleged photos on the Nexus S, the heir apparent to the much beloved Nexus One, from Engadget; and TNW has some very limited information on what kind of carrier availability to expect. Not a whole lot of substantiated facts, to be honest, but at this point I think it’s plausible that there will be a Nexus-branded phone coming out at some point, if it wasn’t already in the making. Too many people want it to happen. (Multiple sources.)
  6. In a pretty clever PR stunt, Sega set up a road crossing in London for one day to raise awareness around hedgehog-related road fatalities – and also to promote their new game, Sonic Colours! It got coverage across gaming sites and in at least one broadsheet. (Hey! The Daily Mail counts, right?) Worth it if only for the above featured super-cute picture of an actual hedgehog wearing teeny-tiny Sonic boots. Priceless. (Via Eurogamer.net, again.)
  7. Giant Bomb published a Quick Look on Tron: Evolution (thankfully, someone came to their senses and got rid of the additional sub-title, “The Video Game”). Having not really followed Tron’s progress, I was totally surprised by what I saw: it actually looked good – like, really, really good; like a game you’d want to play for more than five minutes, as opposed to the usual film-licensed shovelware. I don’t know why I should be so surprised, though. Disney Interactive has really started to take gaming seriously: they released Split/Second: Velocity earlier this year, which I derived immense enjoyment from, out of both its innovative concept and slick execution; they’ve got Epic Mickey on the Wii coming out, also looking like a quality product, from Warren Spector, one of the industry’s greats; and they’ve got this, Tron, too – also looking phenomenal. (Via Giant Bomb.)
  8. Rockstar has announced a new trailer and release date for L.A. Noire, which seems styled like a Chinatown-esque, third-person action game. It looks stunning, really; I’m at a loss for words. I’m a big fan of film noir, and it’s hokey, pulpy, melodramtic elements often can play out very well in a video game setting. (Via Joystiq.)
  9. Finally, we get to me shamelessly self-promoting my new article featured on Resolution-Magazine, entitled “The Miser’s Guide to Gaming On A Budget“. Hopefully it will serve some use for people who, like me, don’t have all the money in the world to spend on games – but wish they did. (Via Resolution-Magazine.)

And that’s all, folks! Tune in next time for… something else, I suspect.

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Community Shitstorm at the Giant Bomb

September 9, 2010 § Leave a comment

There’s a troubling PR crisis brewing over at Giant Bomb at the moment, one of my favourite gaming websites.

They’ve just revealed a new subscriber option, where for $5 a month or $50 a year you get access to a series of premium features they’re offering, including stuff like HD video, mobile versions for any websites hosted on Whisky Media, some avatar bling and possibly a live Friday show.

The other thing they’re doing, unfortunately, is splitting the Bombcast (their weekly podcast) into two one-hour portions, with the first half being filled with time-sensitive discussion, while the second half is only accessible a week after broadcast for free members. Premium members get access to both halves of the podcast at the time of release; and hence, they don’t have to wait.

The big sticking point here is that the two-hour podcast has been and currently is free to everyone. Now, some form it is being taken away and held ransom until a week passes.

The real issue, however, is that it was heavily implied, if not outright stated, that features weren’t going to be taken away, only added, and that they don’t want to split the community. The reality is, though, that people are now being asked to pay for a feature that was previously free, and considering how the Bombcast is one of main features of the site, there will be a community divide between those who have listened to it, and so can discuss the content, and those don’t have access and turn up a week late to the party when everybody’s moved one.

In straight forward terms: they made promises and didn’t keep them, and now some parts of the community feel betrayed; hence, shitstorm.

Personally, I think content creators absolutely have the right to charge consumers for what they produce. I’m hovering over the idea of paying for the monthly subscription, myself, since I visit the site an awful lot, value the content and opinions of the creators and want a decent browsing experience while navigating on my smartphone. I also quite like Tested, one of their sister sites, for the same reasons.

No, I think this is more about broken promises rather than straight-up Internet-user entitlement syndrome.

So, what I’m really interesting in is their response to this. They’re going to be doing their Big Live Live Show: Live! sometime this afternoon, where I expect they’ll address some of these concerns. The questions is: how? The very worst thing they could do is go into victimisation mode and start calling people cheapskates. The very best thing they could do is to drop the splitting up of the podcast idea and reduce the subscription (maybe to $3 per month and $30 per year), but I think this is idealistic. What they’re going to do – what I would do – and what they should do is this: listen to the fans, don’t persecute them, respond to their accusations and be as honest as possible why you’re doing this and what the business realities are. Ryan, Jeff and Dave actually did a pretty good job of justifying the changes in a podcast they did very recently.  It’s a good start, but this is a message they’re going to have to continually repeat, and they’re still going to need to listen and respond to the concerns of the community on this if they are to maintain their good guy image.

I will be watching eagerly to see how this all unfolds.

Whiteboard girl “hoaxed” the Internet hard, apparently

August 12, 2010 § Leave a comment

A bit of reporting from the BBC about the whiteboard girl stunt which turned out to be fake.

As soon as I read this story I felt it missed the point. What’s important wasn’t whether the stunt was true or not; it was funny. Arguably, it was the news outlets that got duped, reporting this nonsense obviously without doing any kind of basic fact checking. The Internet? Was the Internet “duped”? The Internet doesn’t care. And amusingly, The Chive understood this. “Jenny” resurfaced Wednesday, infamous whiteboard in hand, with her last words:

Ultimately the article elucidates two points, both pretty unfortunate for mainstream journalism:

  1. Some mainstream media outlets, who actually have the resources and manpower to professionally cover all sorts of news stories, sometimes have worse journalistic standards than the average Internet blog run by a community of voluntary writers; and that
  2. The mainstream media, even the BBC, still don’t have a real understanding of the Internet or its culture.

(A big thank you to the reddit community; I’m glad I wasn’t alone in thinking this.)

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